Co-housing are intentional communities of private homes clustered around shared space. Explore the intentional communities currently operating and forming in Cincinnati.

Established intentional communities:

Enright Ridge Eco-Village: Located in East Price Hill, the Enright Ridge Eco-Village is an unusual example of an eco-village working well in an urban setting. Founded by Jim and Eileen Schenk, the Eco-Village residents employ various sustainability practices, such as energy-efficient homes, rain water diversion and community gardening. Members’ back yards and common areas support a CSA which serves 50 families in the Price Hill area. For more on Enright Ridge, go to http://enrightecovillage.org.

New Jerusalem Community: This community located near Spring Grove Cemetery is perhaps the best known intentional community in Cincinnati, at least in religious circles, as it was founded by the well-known author, lecturer and Franciscan priest Fr. Richard Rohr. He served as its leader from its beginning in 1971 until 1985. Richard Rohr went on to found the Center for Action and Contemplation and The Rohr Institute in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The New Jerusalem Community continues to be a Catholic lay group of families seeking to live out the Christian gospel in community with each other, with the working class neighborhood in which they live and with the wider world though mission projects. Currently there are about 110 adult members of the community and 45 children.

The Mac House: Opened in 2010, the McGregor (Mac) House in Mount Auburn was designed to serve its residential members while it serves the neighborhood. It provides affordable housing for people who work in the non-profit sector devoting their lives to the betterment of society. It also is open to those “who truly have the heart to serve others living in a simple way.” A livingroom and other common spaces are shared by the 10 adult residents, who spend time in the community helping both adults and children, organizing games, participating in block parties and more. There also are non-residential opportunities to join this community. For more information, go to https://sites.google.com/site/themachousecincinnati/.

Walnut Hills Fellowship: The Walnut Hills Fellowship is a small group of inner-city neighbors living on the east side of Cincinnati. Organized in January of 2007, the community gathers for weekly dinners which provide both physical nourishment and spiritual encouragement to the group, which sees itself as a “congregation.” The community provides affordable housing, academic support, personal counseling, work support and prison visitation. For more information, email bartcampolo@gmail.com or call (513) 404-2431.

Vineyard Central: This group in Norwood is a church and an intentional community with shared gardens, its own cafe and community activities. For more information, go to http://www.vineyardcentral.com/.

Communities forming now:

Pilot House: This group is remodeling a three-story house near the Enright Eco-Village in Price Hill. Residents will live according to eco-community models with sustainable practices in a home with common spaces and private bedroom spaces. Opportunities for trying out the cooperative, sustainable living arrangement on a short-term basis are available. Shared ownership and micro-farming are part of the community’s plans.Currently there are three members. For more information, call (513) 828-2930.

A New Urban Monastery: This group is comprised of mostly Catholic Christians who are more than 55 years of age who wish to pray, live and pursue interests and actions involving social justice and ecology together. The group currently is organizing shared homes of five to eight persons in Walnut Hills, East Walnut Hills and Evanston between Eden Park and Xavier University. There now are four adult members. For details, go to http://www.anewurbanmonastery.org/.

Sharing Circle Community: Sharing Circle, established in 1999 is currently re-forming and may move from its West 8th Street location to Georgetown, OH. Members of this community do meditating and engage in spiritual practices, with a sensitivity to sustainability. As it continues to make plans for its future, Sharing Circle is temporarily holding off admitting new members.